No Picture
General Article

Helicobacter Pylori Is A Major Cause of Iron Deficiency Anemia

Helicobacter Pylori Is A Major Cause of Iron Deficiency Anemia

If you are feeling tired, weak or just generally not yourself, you may well be deficient in key nutrients such as iron. Iron deficiency can have several causes, one of which is H pylori infection.

Fatigue and weakness are not symptoms that would generally be associated with H pylori, but there is a body of research indicating a strong association between H pylori infection and the development of iron-deficiency anemia.

H pylori bacteria can create an autoimmune response against the parietal cells of the stomach. These cells are responsible for the production of the hydrochloric acid that helps you to break down food.

Damage to these parietal cells can cause a drop in your stomach acid levels. When this happens, food may not be broken-down properly. In particular, you may have a hard time breaking down proteins and releasing minerals such as iron from the food. As a consequence, the iron may not be absorbed effectively from the gut into your body.

This inability to digest food and absorb nutrients may occur independently of the classic H pylori symptoms such as heartburn or acid reflux. In other words, you may feel tired and weak because of the infection without having any digestive symptoms, making it hard to associate your symptoms with a problem in the digestive system.

Common symptoms of iron deficiency anemia are as follows:

Fatigue and low energy levelsWeaknessGeneral malaisePoor ConcentrationShortness of breathRestless leg syndromePale skin, nail beds and gumsFaster heart beat (tachycardia)

How do we know H pylori can cause iron deficiency anemia? Is there any research to support the notion?

I have found numerous studies demonstrating that H pylori is very closely associated with iron deficiency anemia. These studies have been published in peer reviewed journals such as “Gut”, “World Journal of Gastroenterology” and also in the European Helicobacter Study Group’s journal, “Helicobacter”.

Of particular concern is the role of H pylori in childhood. Growth retardation is strongly associated with iron deficiency and H pylori infection. If H pylori prevents children from digesting food and absorbing nutrients, it is not surprising that this association exists. I recommend that the parents of any child experiencing growth retardation should have their child tested not only H pylori, but also for celiac disease and other digestive infections such as bacteria, parasites and fungal overgrowth.

It is clear that H pylori is responsible for much more than heartburn, acid reflux and digestive pain. The fact that it can slow down stomach acid production by damaging parietal cells in the stomach can result in poor breakdown of food and subsequent compromise in a patient’s ability to absorb nutrients.

Iron, vitamin B12, folic acid and other nutrient deficiencies have all been associated with low stomach acid and the presence of H pylori. Therefore, if you have been diagnosed with these deficiencies, or if you are experiencing any of the symptoms mentioned in this article without reasonable explanation, it would be wise to seek breath or stool testing for Helicobacter pylori.

Optimising your diet, removing H pylori, optimising gut healing and stomach acid/digestive enzyme levels are the key steps in making a full recovery. Caution should be taken with iron supplementation because many of the iron supplements used by doctors cause further distress to the gut. Some supplement manufacturers have developed iron supplements that do not cause these side effects.…

No Picture
General Article

10 Professional Tips For The Treatment Of Iron-Deficiency Anemia!

10 Professional Tips For The Treatment Of Iron-Deficiency Anemia!

Not all patients presenting with hematological findings of iron deficiency are iron deficient. The iron storage sites may show abundant iron which is unavailable for haemoglobinisation of the developing red cells. This is usually associated with chronic inflammatory or neoplastic disease in which there is an inhibition of mobilization of iron from the body stores. Here are ten useful professional tips for the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia.

1. It is self evident that the patient who is iron deficient requires iron. Almost all patients can be treated by the oral route and the cheapest preparation is ferrous sulphate given as a tablet containing 200 mg three times a day.

2. A small proportion of patients develop indigestion, constipation or diarrhea and then more expensive proprietary preparations may be tried. There are many of these and there is probably little to choose between them except that preparations employing a delayed release effect are to be avoided although they may give rise to less side-effects. This reflects the fact that they do not release the elemental iron at the best absorption site.

3. Some proprietary preparations can be given once daily. For the patient who cannot swallow tablets, proprietary liquid preparations may be used and are generally palatable.

4. Evidence of a response to oral medication usually appears in under two weeks. When there is concomitant inflammatory or neoplastic disease, response may be much slower and oral therapy should not be discarded until two to three months have passed. If no response is seen, it may be that the patient is not taking the tablets for a variety of reasons.

5. A check may be made by examining the stool which should he grey black if the patient is taking the tablets.

6. The rise in reticulocyte count associated with response to iron therapy is usually modest and seldom above 10%. After the hemoglobin level has returned to normal, iron should be continued for at least six months and in some cases a year in order to replenish iron stores. In cases of malabsorption, almost continuous therapy may be required or the parenteral route utilized.

7. Commercial preparations of iron for injection should not be used except when one or other of the oral preparations cannot be tolerated or is found to be ineffective. The parenteral route of administration is suitable for the few patients who are genuinely unable to take iron by mouth because of pain, vomiting or diarrhea, or who are unable to absorb iron because of some disorder of the gastrointestinal tract.

8. Iron given by injection has been used for the treatment of the anemia of rheumatoid arthritis, for the correction of severe anemia in the late stages of pregnancy and following major operations.

9. The recommended single dose of iron-sorbitol is 15 mg of iron per kg of body weight given daily. It is assumed that about 250 mg of iron are required to increase the hemoglobin level by 1 g/dl of blood but the total dosage of iron should not exceed 2.5 g. Iron-sorbitol should be given by intramuscular injection and should never be given intravenously.

10. Iron-dextran is seldom given intramuscularly because of local irritation and since it has been shown to cause sarcomatous change in certain animals. It can be given intravenously by what is known as the ‘total dose infusion method’ in a suitable diluents.…

No Picture
General Article

Dyspnea Causes

Dyspnea Causes

Are you familiar with the term dyspnea? It refers to a shortness of breath that is experienced by the patient. When someone goes through heavy physical activity, this is a normal occurrence. However, sometimes it shows up when it wouldn’t typically be considered normal. In such a circumstance, it may have an underlying medical cause such as a disease. This page discusses some possibilities for these causes of dyspnea.

Anemia

This condition usually involves a shortage of red blood cells (RBCs) in the bloodstream of the person involved. It can cause the person to experience shortness of breath. In many cases, the symptoms that are felt in anemia are vague, or simply not considered major. Due to this, the condition is often not detected in a quick manner. However, it is possible for other symptoms to show up. For instance, the individual may have pale skin — this situation is known as pallor. He may also feel fatigue. The treatment that is selected for someone with anemia varies from one case to another, and the underlying cause behind it plays a part in the determination of which option is considered preferable.

Pneumonia

This condition involves inflammation that affects the person’s lungs. Most often, it is brought on by a bacterial infection. S. pneumoniae is a common reason within that group. There are other underlying causes, including viruses, and some cases of this illness simply don’t have a known cause. Aside from dyspnea, a patient with pneumonia may also have a cough. Having a fever is also a distinct possibility. Pain may affect the person’s muscles and/or joints. Chest X-rays are frequently used in order to confirm a case of pneumonia. Blood tests are another possible tool for confirming a diagnosis. The treatment method of preference here also changes, in particular based upon what has caused the illness.

Hypothyroidism

In hypothyroidism, the individual has a thyroid with low function. Due to this, a lesser than normal amount of thyroid hormones is produced. Dyspnea can appear when a patient has this condition, although it is a relatively rare symptom. Another possibility is that a goiter may appear. This is where the thyroid gland swells, and therefore the neck does as well (in some cases, it may be the larynx that is involved). Cholesterol levels may also be high in a person with hypothyroidism. For women with this condition, there may be abnormalities in the menstrual cycles. Iodine deficiency is the most frequent cause of this illness.…

No Picture
General Article

Treating Fibroids – Treating Anemia

Treating Fibroids – Treating Anemia

Being diagnosed with fibroids I had to think fast whether or not I should submit myself to going through the hysterectomy operation and having my fibroids taken out. I had been diagnosed only a week prior to the operation date and the surgeon was adamant that he wanted me to have this operation! I didn’t have time to think I didn’t have time to understand what the whole procedure was about I just said yes I will have the operation if it is going to start the loss of blood that I had been experiencing.

Prior to the visit to the surgeon’s office, I had been informed by my doctor that the loss of blood was so drastic that I had lost weight and had contracted anemia. My doctor did not realize straight away that I had been suffering with anemia. He noticed my loss of weight and my prolonged periods but he had not detected that I had anemia and this took him 3 months to realize in which time weight had dropped off.

Once he realized he subscribed me with iron tablets which controlled the bleeding but as most drugs carry, they were also prone to side effects. Once I was informed of this by my doctor, I had to find an alternative method. So a trip to see my nutritionist paid off and she insisted that I purchase some organic herbal supplements which would not only control the bleeding, it also returned lost blood cells and also nutrients which the body was lacking – and this she found out just by looking at my tongue and eyes – amazing stuff!

So what I am saying to you is get off the drugs and find alternative organic herbal supplements which is just as fantastic in the results you will gain and at the same time you will be instilling some more nutrients, minerals and vitality back into your body. Its time to make that change – also change the way you eat – eat more healthily – this will also reduce your weight, it will add more important properties to your internal body temple and it will rejuvenate, strengthen and invigorate your whole body. It needs looking after and in turn your body will look after you.…

No Picture
General Article

Vitamin B12 Anemia – A Potentially Fatal Condition

Vitamin B12 Anemia – A Potentially Fatal Condition

B12 Anemia can be a mild disease or a very serious one, and in some cases it can even be life-threatening. So with such serious consequences, and many people being B12 deficient without realizing, it’s important that you know all about this potentially fatal condition.

Vitamin B12 helps the body manufacture red blood cells, so a deficiency in B12 can cause anemia, which is an insufficient number of these blood cells. This leads to the body being starved of oxygen and can affect the lungs, organs and central nervous system.

B12 Deficiency SymptomsTypically symptoms include exhaustion, fuzzy thinking, depression, pale skin. They may also look like they are drained and lacking in sleep. This may indeed be the case, because insomnia is a secondary sign of anemia.

Anemia can be a mild illness but can get more serious over time. Nerve endings can die, which cause the fingers and other extremities to become numb or to have a tingling sensation. In extreme cases anemia can cause degeneration of the spinal cord, organ failure, and death.

TreatmentTreatment depends on what caused the anemia. Perhaps the patient isn’t getting enough B12, in which case it can be added to the diet via food or supplements. Or they may not be able to make use of the B12 they are getting, due to lack of intrinsic factor, in which case they may need B12 injections or patches.

If you have any symptoms of anemia it is very important that you see your doctor so that he can test you for both anemia and for B12 deficiency. If you have a B12 deficiency it’s very important to get it sorted out as soon as possible, as it can lead to irreversible nerve damage and even death.

Most at RiskThe people are most at risk are vegan, vegetarians and people over 50. But one recent study suggested the up to 40% of the US population may be deficient, so don’t think that this couldn’t happen to you. Even if you have enough B12 in your diet, you have no way of knowing if you body has enough intrinsic factor to be able to use it.…

No Picture
General Article

What Are The Symptoms Of Anemia?

What Are The Symptoms Of Anemia?

Anemia is a condition developed when the hemoglobin or the red blood cell count in the blood become comparatively low as compared to the normal level. This normal level varies with sex. Men and women generally have variations in the normal level of hemoglobin. The levels of hemoglobin are different in males and females. Hemoglobin level of less than 13.5 gram/100 ml is generally considered as standard and that of less than 12.0 gram/100 ml is considered as standard in case of females. However, these values are not fixed. They vary depending upon the laboratory reference taken into consideration and upon the source taken.

The major cause leading to anemia can be summarized as follows. It is a result of any process due to which the normal life span of red blood cell is decreased which leads to less number of red blood cells. Generally, the normal life span of red blood cells is about 120 days but in typical situations this life span decreases which ultimately leads to less number of RBCs left in the blood. These red blood cells are formed in the bone marrow.

Hence, basic factor leading to anemia is the reduction of RBCs doesn’t matter how. It can happen due to the reduction in the normal production of the red blood cell or hemoglobin in the blood. The other major reason which accounts to this problem is the destruction or the loss of the blood.

Besides these factors there are certain other factors that ultimately produce the condition of anemia. Anemia in various cases is also hereditary. Due to the presence of some genetic disorders, the life span of red blood cells is decreased and this then results into the reduced amount of RBCs in our blood. There may be various disorders particularly hereditary which lead to difficulty in the production of hemoglobin in the blood which then, results into less hemoglobin content in the blood. The severity of the anemia caused due to various genetic factors varies from person to person. Sometimes, the condition is so crucial that it leads to the death of the foetus and in some cases the effect of genetic factors are almost negligible.

There are various symptoms that may help you know about the anemia. Some of them include experiencing tiredness much easily after doing little amount of work and becoming pale. In certain cases, there may be hair loss.

One should consult the doctor immediately to avoid any sort of complications.…

No Picture
General Article

Anemia Treatment – How to Treat Anemia From Home

Anemia Treatment – How to Treat Anemia From Home

The treatment of anemia is dependent on type of anemia that you have. If the cause of anemia is by internal bleeding or cancer then a more serious treatment may be required such as surgery.

Anemia can be caused by a wide variety of environmental triggers such as chemotherapy or heavy metal exposure.

Internal bleeding caused by hemorrhoids is also a common cause that patients are unaware of.

Very often though Anemia has a behavioural causation (Your actions have caused it)

And once the source problem is known it can often be treated by you. The obvious trigger is diet related in which the treatment revolves around a high iron and vitamin rich diet.

The other alternative often prescribed by the doctor is to take 1-2 Iron tablets daily with vitamin C rich food which aids in the uptake of iron.

Iron can be purchased in tablet form from most supermarkets.

If you are interested in getting your anemia from more natural sources try eating more red meat, beans, fish, liver and green vegetables. Try to consume your high iron foods with vitamin C. This helps the absorption of the iron itself.

If you plan to cure your anemia from home then you will need to know a little about it.

Anemia Is a disease of the blood in which either an Iron or vitamin B12 deficiency causes a decreased carrying capacity of oxygen.

A lack of Vitamin b12 usually means a decreased Oxygen carrying efficiency of the hemoglobin. A lack of Iron causes fewer red blood cells to be produced, leading to less oxygen carried by the blood.

In both scenarios one is left feeling weak and often tired from light exercise. This affects your day to day life and decreased work output.…