Identifying Low Ferritin Symptoms

Identifying Low Ferritin Symptoms

Before you can identify whether or not you’re suffering from low ferritin symptoms you need to better understand ferritin itself. Ferritin is a protein complex that transports iron to your tissues and moderates iron levels within your body. Iron is a critical tool for providing oxygen to every organ and tissue in your body. Thus ferritin is an important component for healthy overall body functioning; low levels of ferritin means a less effective blood supply to many of your vital bodily functions.

Identifying Low Ferritin Symptoms

There are a few different symptoms you may experience if you are low in ferritin. The most difficult aspect of identifying some of these symptoms is that they can seem so subtle you may not realize they are caused by low ferritin instead of just the day-to-day fluctuations of your mood and energy level. Such symptoms can include lack of energy, lowered libido, irritability, minor aches and pains, mild weakness and difficulty focusing.

If your ferritin is too low it can lead to anemia. Signs of anemia can include pale skin, brittle nails, fatigue, heart palpitations and bruising that occurs too easily.

Anemia symptoms may include some of the previously mentioned signs of lower ferritin, but they tend to manifest in a more severe or more persistent manner. Some confuse anemia with low ferritin, but they are not the same thing. Rather, a low blood serum ferritin level is often a precursor to anemia.

Because low ferritin can be linked to other health conditions like hypothyroid disease, it is good to check with your doctor if you feel you may be suffering from low blood serum ferritin levels. It also makes you feel less than your best so it is good to get to the bottom of the issue.

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Safely Treating Ferritin Levels

While taking an iron supplement may be the most obvious solution, iron supplementation should be discussed with a physician. Iron toxicity is a real danger and thus proper dosage and usage should be discussed and planned in advanced. Keep iron supplements out of reach of children; iron toxicity occurs most often in children.

In addition, you may also want to include some healthy foods like spinach in your regular diet. Iron is better absorbed when consumed with Vitamin C, so a spinach and kale salad with walnuts and orange slices can make for an excellent addition to your diet if you feel like iron or ferritin is an issue for you.